The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

In Oedipus the Kinghe seems like a totally rational guy. In Oedipus at Colonus he becomes the full-fledged smooth-talker he had in him all along. His hyper-logical mind refuses to recognize the bonds of familial love that tie Antigone to her brother Polyneices. He rejects the irrational laws of the gods in favor the rational laws of man:

The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

Tri Pramesti Introduction In literature the term tragedy is dealt with sad event or situation.

Creon is the tragic character in the play “Antigone”. Creon’s tragic flaw, hubris, causes his downfall. Creon will not listen to anyone. He is stubborn and his pride is so great, he can not bring himself to acknowledge that he could ever wrong. When Creon is talking to Teiresias, he thinks that he is . Antigone might be the name of the tragedy, but I believe that Creon is the winning candidate. His role in the plot of this tragedy, his sensible tragic fault, and his dynamic character are the obvious reasons why I chose him as the tragic hero. In Sophocles’s tragedy, Antigone, the meaning and recognition of fate heavily weighs down Creon’s pride and Antigone’s love. With a sense of lawful righteousness and tyranny, Creon believes burying Polynices is truly unlawful and seeks obedience in his resolution.

This term is conventionally reserved for a type of drama in which the protagonists is defeated. Besides sad even or situation, tragedy is also imitation. The result which is expected from tragedy is that the audience should be purged of both pity and fear by the time the tragedy comes to an end.

By suffering vicariously with the tragic hero, the audience has a greater moral awareness and keener self-knowledge.

Oedipus, King of Thebes has died at Colonus, but his two daughters and his son, Eteocles, continue to live in the palace of their father. However, when a second son, Polynices, makes war against Thebes to regain the kingdom both Eteocles and Polynices kill each other.

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Creon, their uncle becomes a kind and announces his law hat Eteocles who has died in defending his country will be given an honored burial, whereas Polynices who is regarded as an enemy will be left unburied.

Whoever breaks the laa will be stoned to death. Antigone, one of the daughters of Oedipus flouts at the order of Creon and gives Polynices the hurried burial; and act which affords the play in a tragic theme.

Antigone buries Polynices because she is sure that her act is innocent and will be blessed by God. But when Antigone is going to be stoned to death, she decides to follow her against Creon.

Haimon is a son of Creon and betrothed to Antigone. He reminds Creon, if Antigone dies, her death will be followed by another.

Project MUSE - Conflict and Reconciliation in Hegel's Theory of the Tragic With a sense of lawful righteousness and tyranny, Creon believes burying Polynices is truly unlawful and seeks obedience in his resolution.
Summer Reading - Hegel/Antigone A "recognition," as the term itself implies, is a change from ignorance to knowledge, producing either friendship or hatred in those who are destined for good fortune or ill. There are also other forms of recogntion, for what we have described may in a sense occur in relation to inanimate and trivial objects, or one may recognize whether some one has done something or not.

Teiresias is a blind soothsayer. He reminds Creon about his mistake.

The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

At last Teiresias warns his prediction about calamity which will happen. When she knows that her son, Haimon, has died by being stoned, she decides to follow him.

Besides these characters, there are several minor characters in this play: The chorus is considered as society, and the narrator in this play comments of the former and later acts.

The setting of the play is before the royal palace of Thebes at dawn of the day, after the repulse of the Argive Army, the enemy, from the assault on Thebes.

The central character or protagonist, usually called a tragic hero, is a person of high estate, apparently a king or queen or another member of the royal family. The nature of tragedy is that the protagonist must fall from power or happiness.

His high estate gives him a place of dignity to fall. Besides a person of high estate, he is also the symbol of man in general and capable enough against his enemy.

Because of his tragic flaw he is led to death despair or misery though some sort of mistake, either in himself or in his action. The most cited flaw is "hubris" which means excessive, self-destructive pride.

The action a tragedy is not accidental but logical and inevitable, and the hero is directly or indirectly responsible for his fate Potter, The second conception of Greek tragedy is thematic significance. Thematic significance is a positive element in tragedy.In every Greek tragedy, there is the tragic hero, defined by Aristotle as a character who is an extraordinary person, with both good and bad qualities.

Although the character reaches a level of insight, a tragic flaw, such as hamartia, leads to their failure in the end. - Antigone Antigone, by Sophocles, is a story about the struggle between Antigone, who represents the laws of the gods and Creon, who represents the laws of the state. The play takes place circa B.C.

in the city-state of Thebes. In Sophocles’s tragedy, Antigone, the meaning and recognition of fate heavily weighs down Creon’s pride and Antigone’s love. With a sense of lawful righteousness and tyranny, Creon believes burying Polynices is truly unlawful and seeks obedience in his resolution.

SparkNotes: Antigone: Creon

The conflict between Creon and Antigone is one of conflicting values and duties. Creon is trying to establish himself as king. In Creon's mind, since Antigone's brother Polynices violated the laws of the government, he does not deserve a respectful burial.

On the basis of Creon’s intractable adherence to his edict, the sisters’ relationship is strained, kindred connections between Creon and Antigone and Ismene are rejected, and, finally, Creon. While the prophet predicted tragedy would befall Creon's house, the chorus' use of words here is ironic, given that the prophet did not have a hand in what actually happened nor is the outcome good.

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